SWINGIN’ WITH SUÁREZ

With her rich, expressive interpretations, Charleston chanteuse Leah Suárez joins sister vocalists Ann Caldwell and Quiana Parler in a celebrated triumvirate of Holy City voices, as distinctive in style as they are in personality.

A MUSIC FESTIVAL’S VIVID HUES

One of the most celebrated musical figures of the 18th century, Joseph Bologne, the Chevalier de Saint-Georges (1745–1799), was a renaissance man of African-French heritage. He was an anomaly in his time: a black virtuoso in a sea of white classical musicians and composers.

TAKING THE CHALLENGING PATH

Sharon Graci and Rodney Lee Rogers could not have chosen a more appropriate name for their company, PURE Theatre. It’s a name that reflects the best sort of ambition—a striving for pure excellence.

BALANCING MUSIC AND ANTHROPOLOGY

Like a certain raider of lost arks, singer-songwriter Hector Qirko balances a career in academe with a rowdier, adventurous spirit “in the field,” which is to say on stage. He brings a quest mentality to both. The College of Charleston anthropology professor, who earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of Tennessee, approaches […]

SMALL SCALE, LARGE EXPERIENCE

Hearing top musical acts in an intimate setting adds layers of pleasure that arenas or large concert halls simply can’t match. While teenagers and college kids flock to huge venues, in part for the spectacle of it, their elders want something a little less frantic and deafening, with minimal pyrotechnics but maximum musicianship.

WHAT NEEDS TO BE SAID

Plato would have recognized Brian Hicks straightaway as a “gadfly,” the philosopher’s term for someone who provokes the power structure and lampoons foolishness.

CONNECTING ARTISTS AND PATRONS

Mystery, and mastery, are the linchpins of Charleston Supported Art (CSA), a program founded in 2013 by seven women intimately involved in the area arts community. Their goals: to stem an outflow of contemporary artists from the Charleston area and introduce a wider audience to their work.

A LIVELY ENSEMBLE

It’s a cliché born of a dozen movies. Formally dressed dinner guests, having finished a sumptuous repast, settle into a drawing room with their brandies and liqueurs to enjoy the evening’s entertainment: live classical chamber music. Within minutes, eyelids heavy, they are nodding off. This popular image distorts the reality of a musical form that can be vibrant and invigorating. “It scares people away in some cases. They’re not sure how they are supposed to act or what they are going to hear,” says Sandra Nikolajevs, president and artistic director of Chamber Music Charleston (chambermusiccharleston.com), now in its ninth season.

DOROTHEA BENTON FRANK: THE NOVELIST AT EASE

On a sun-splashed day in her new Sullivan’s Island home, Dorothea Benton Frank nibbles on a piece of cake from the Peninsula Grill, sips a cool glass of ice tea and muses on the fates that have brought her, the Bard of the Beach, to this pass, a New York Times best-selling author whose 16th novel, All the Single Ladies, debuts this summer.

MUSIC SPEAK

Do you know an allemande from an arpeggio? A bagatelle from a badinerie? Does the difference between a fugue and an étude elude you?